<![CDATA[Lone Pine Toolworks - MY BLOG]]>Mon, 15 Jan 2018 16:27:26 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[HAPPY THANKSGIVING!]]>Thu, 23 Nov 2017 13:41:39 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/happy-thanksgiving]]><![CDATA[Tool Sharpening Angles]]>Mon, 20 Nov 2017 17:27:32 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/tool-sharpening-anglesMuch has been written about the angle(s) that we should be sharpening plane irons, chisels, etc. A truly sharp edge is defined as two surfaces meeting at an exact point, the crisper if you will that those surfaces meet the sharper that that edge becomes. There are different angles for different tasks that one does. For instance, a paring chisel used in truing up tenon cheeks should have a shallower angle of let’s say 20 degrees, while a mortise chisel should have a steep angle of 30-35 degrees so when subjected to chopping out mortises one doesn’t ‘roll over’ the edge. All of this depends in part to what sort of wood we are working with.
That all said now there are secondary bevels to the primary bevel. There are micro bevels done on the back of the plane iron, chisel etc. All ways that when ones skill level increases so can one experiment with these different approaches to sharpening.
                Because of the volume of sharpening that I do for clients, for the initial sharpening I use a Work Sharp. This allows me not only to create the perfect angle but also to back flatten whatever I’m sharpening. My goal when I sharpen is to create a mirror surface working to 1000 grit then honing with a leather stropping board and chromium oxide compound.
                I used to try and cater to each individuals needs by putting together edge angles that they preferred. I no longer do that, instead I sharpen straight primary bevels of 25 degrees. Now this is for general sharpening when I’m doing a batch of plane irons for instance. If a client sends me a new set of mortise chisels or a set of paring chisels I will set up and do different primary bevels. I will however leave the secondary beveling and micro beveling to the client.

               
Professional woodworkers for the most part sharpen by hand as they work as over time they’ve learned to ‘teach’ their hands to hold a certain angle all the way through the sharpening and honing process. Are their angles right on 20 or 25 or 30 degrees? Probably not…what they do have are two angles meeting at a point and THAT is the key to a great edge! 
              
The purpose of this blog entry is to help out those folks that are stumped or think there is a mystery to sharpening. This article is in no way meant to be final treatise on sharpening, rather just some thoughts that I have. Since we have at our hands (or fingertips) literally hundreds of books and so forth on all aspects of woodworking it is easy to get mired in facts, figures what have you. Somewhere along the line we need to step back and see that it’s the joy of creating and working with wood that should be our goal…the true fun of making something with our own hands.
 All for now, good luck, play safe and God Bless!
Yours in Shavings,
T

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<![CDATA[Porter-Ferguson Auto Body Tools]]>Thu, 02 Mar 2017 21:07:14 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/porter-ferguson-auto-body-toolsTowards the end of last year I was sent 2 boxes of Porter-Ferguson auto body tools. Ken, the client who owns this set, wanted to know if I was up to doing a large collection of these and as each box weighed in at over 60 lbs it was quite the set!
 The poster to the left shows just a few of what this company produced. To give one an idea of the quantity of this set, whereas the poster shows just 2 hand held dollies, Ken's set had 9. There was 17 different hammers, picks, spoon bill dollies of every configuration, you name it there was one in those 2 boxes!
Since the hammers all needed new handles, that is where I started with stripping off what remained of the old finishes.
The photo upper left shows a few of them masked off and one hung with its new handle.
This was the first batch completed and ready for packing and shipment.
The second batch containing the (9) dollies.
This third batch completed the tool order. It also contains a Stanley #144 rabbett plane and a set of pliers made in Germany.
Many hours went into doing these tools; lots of masking off of parts with some creative methods of hanging them for paint and clear coats. All in all a lot of fun and thanks Ken for sending me this great collection to restore!
Until the next time, play safe and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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<![CDATA[A Trio of Sweetheart Hand Planes]]>Wed, 25 Jan 2017 17:30:01 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/a-trio-of-sweetheart-hand-planesA while back I had been contacted by a client wanting to have restored (3) of these Stanley hand planes. There was a Bedrock 607C, a Stanley/Bailey no.5C and a Stanley/Bailey no. 10/1/2 rabeting plane. Best part about it was they were handed down from his great grandpa who, due to the dating of them purchased these in the years 1923-1925. One patent date behind the frog, no raised ring under the front knob and that beautiful sweetheart logo.
A bit of an explanation of the logo contents is in order; Stanley, in the notched logo stands of the Stanley Rule and Level company, the tool producer, and this signified the merger with The Stanley Works, the hardware producer. The heart shape was a memorial to long time Stanley Works president William Hart; the so called Sweetheart planes in tool junkie circles were produced from 1919 to 1932.
The planes arrived at my shop covered with 90 years of surface rust and paint specks so a complete resto was done on each plane.
I think David's Great Grand Pa would approve the refurbishing of this trio of his old planes!
All of now other than to wish you well, play safe and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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<![CDATA[Merry Christmas!]]>Fri, 23 Dec 2016 18:45:49 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/merry-christmas


Hoping all find their inner peace during this Holiday Season,
Merry Christmas and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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<![CDATA[Restoring a Champion Forge & Blower Post Drill Press]]>Sun, 06 Nov 2016 06:57:45 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/restoring-a-champion-forge-blower-post-drill-pressHad this one sent a few weeks back to the shop for a resto.
During dis-assembly I take quite a few photos for reference later if need be. The side show will have this plethora of photos. They do come in handy when that questions arises "now how does this mount up?"
The following photos are the completed press; I painted the letters on the one which was fun.
That finishes this project up, what with the holidays coming up my shop gets pretty busy, that said, give a shout if you have need of my services, glad to help.
Take care, play safe, and God Bless,
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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<![CDATA[Restoring the Millers Falls No. 68 Miter Box.]]>Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:01:28 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/restoring-the-millers-falls-no-68-miter-boxThis miter box, less common than the '70's series of boxes, came into my shop awhile back and I wanted to post photos of dis-assembly and completion. Always so handy to have photos if one finds themselves 'elbow deep' in a resto and wonder "where does this piece go"?
With that in mind, on to the slide show...

As you can tell, I take A LOT of photos when restoring a piece; saved my bacon on more than one project.
And a few photos of the completion...

This miter box had such a nice badge on the front post, I've seen many many that are creased up, banged up, dented up to the point that they must be scrapped.
That does it for this post, if you have any tools that you'd like to see new again give me a shout, I'd be delighted to give you a quote.
Have a great day, play safe, and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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<![CDATA[Goodell-Pratt Bench Drill Presses]]>Sat, 11 Jun 2016 11:10:36 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/goodell-pratt-bench-drill-pressesIn a previous blog entry I covered the restoration of a Goodell-Pratt no. 9 1/2 bench drill press. Just recently I had a chance to do another and also it's 'lil brother' the single speed model. Below are the pair:
Below are a couple photos showing the two speed and single speed gearboxes respectively.
I have another set of these drill presses for anyone that might be interested in purchasing one or both; fill out and send the contact form and I'll get back to you. Also, for Father's Day I've lowered prices on the Tools for Sale page for those interested in the perfect gift.
My client 'to do' list is getting short now so if you have any tool work you'd like done I'd be delighted to give you a quote. Other than that, I've the windows and doors open and the birds are singing me a serenade...either that or they are telling me to get to work so I'd better sign off!
Do take care, enjoy your weekend, and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings',
T

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<![CDATA[Marvelous Collection of Chisel Sets]]>Sun, 08 May 2016 12:52:50 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/marvelous-collection-of-chisel-setsA while ago a regular client (Hiya Ken!) sent an email that he had finally completed his chisel sets collection...and yes, I said 'sets'.
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Stanley No.720 Chisel Set (12pc)
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Stanley No.50 Everlasting Chisel Set (12pc)
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Stanley No.40 Everlasting Chisel Set (12pc)

Now isn't that about enough to make a tool junkie's legs turn to jelly? When Ken sends me tools to work up he sends in bunches. Two years ago around Christmas time was the wonderful group of bench planes.
Also with the planes were some antique Wiss scissors...
Next were the sets of spoke shaves, the before and after photos below....
So when he sent the chisel sets, and as I unpacked/unrolled them I knew I was in for a treat! The No.720 chisels were fine handle-wise just needed setting (use hair spray for that, works great!). The No.50's and No.40's needed new finishes applied, below are the #40's.
I applied multiple coats of gloss lacquer to them, followed by a general polish of the metal, then sharpened through 1000 grit and leather stropped. Note: Always sharpen last when restoring chisels, saves on Band-aids! Ken had also sent a Swede saw that was a third generation saw used to cut the annual Christmas tree and a later type 19 jack plane.
The following photos show the tool spread..
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So that was it for that order, all were carefully wrapped, packed, and shipped with this blog entry to remember these marvelous chisel sets by.
With that I'll sign off for now, Happy Mother's Day to all you Mum's out there.
Have fun, play safe, and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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<![CDATA[Projects by Chris J.]]>Wed, 23 Mar 2016 10:59:15 GMThttp://lonepinetoolworks.com/my-blog/projects-by-chris-jChris is a client that sent photos of some of the projects he's done. He loves to work wood using hand tools and trekking the Great Outdoors.
The table below is made of Bubinga.

I do love quarter sawn oak and the Gentleman's chest below is just wonderful.

I wish you all a great day, play safe, and God Bless!
Your 'Friend in Shavings'
T

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